Kreg Llewellyn

Kreg Llewellyn got an early start to his water ski career when he frequented Sylvan Lake with his family. At age 6 he entered a tournament and the rest is history. Kreg is one of Canada’s most successful skier’s of all time. Known for his Overall strength and individual performances Jump, his innovative mastery in Tricks, and strong performances in slalom.  He was a dominant force on the water ski circuit for over 20 years. Kreg’s first year on the National Team was 1984 and his brilliant skiing played an important role in the team’s World Championship titles in 1991, 1993 and 1999. 


Kreg is known as an innovator that pushed the sport of waterskiing and wakeboarding to new levels.  Kreg was the first to perform SL5B, SL5F, Sl7bb,    RSLo, Double Mobius FF.  Other innovations were the first to use a speed suit in jumping (Borrowed from Steve Bush) and the first to do a back flip on a wakeboard (Skuffer) in early 1988. Subsequently, Kreg Llewelyn was hired by Tony Finn (inventor of Skuffer / wakeboard), makes Kreg the first professional wakeboarder in history. 

Despite being plagued with several injuries over the years, Kreg still managed to win three medals at the
1991 World Championships in Austria, equaling the best-ever performance of 3 medals at the World Championships for any Canadian. He is a 2 Time World Overall Silver Medalist, a World Slalom Medalist, U.S. Masters Trick Champion, 2 Time U.S. Open Overall and Trick Champion, and a Moomba Masters Overall and Trick Champion. Kreg currently holds 24 Canadian National Records in all three water ski events.


Inducted into the Hall of Fame 2006

“It’s something you don’t think about in your competitive years but it is sure nice to get that recognition,” said Llewellyn,  “It’s a great opportunity to thank everyone that helped you along the way. Water skiing can be an individualistic sport so for me my fondest memories are winning the world team titles for Canada and all the friendship over the years”

Best Tournament Performances 

  • Jump: 202 Feet
  • Slalom 4@39off
  • Trick: 11,300 points

National/International Results

  • SLALOM TRICKS JUMP OVERALL 
  • 1999 Worlds Championships 3rd 
  • 1996 Pan American Championships 1st
  • 1995 IOC Pan American 
  • Championships 2nd
  • 1992 Canadian Championships 6th
  • 1992 Pan Am Championships 2nd 
  • 1990 Pan Am Championships 2nd 
  • 1989 Canadian Championships 1st 
  • 1992 Canadian Championships 2nd
  • 1992 U.S. Masters 1st
  • 1992 OzSki 1st 
  • 1991 World Championships Austria 3rd 
  • 1990 U.S. Open 2nd 
  • 1989 Canadian Championships 1st 
  • 1989 U.S. Open 1st 
  • 1988 Pan Am Championships 1st 
  • 1988 U.S. Open 1st 
  • 1988 MoombaMasters 1st 
  • 1986 Pan Am Championships 1st
  • 1995 Canadian Championships 1st
  • 1992 Canadian Championships 2nd 
  • 1992 Pan Am Championships 2nd 
  • 1992 OzSki 3rd 
  • 1991 World Championships Austria 3rd 
  • 1990 Pan Am Championships 2nd 
  • 1989 Canadian Championships 1st 
  • 1989 Coors Tour/Vallejo 3rd
  • 1988 Pan Am Championships 2nd
  • 1999 Worlds Championships 3rd 
  • 1997 Worlds Championships 2nd
  • 1996 Canadian Nationals 1st 
  • 1995 Canadian Championships 1st
  • 1995 World Championships 3rd
  • 1992 Canadian Championships 2nd 
  • 1992 Pan Am Championships 4th 
  • 1991 World Championships Austria 2nd 
  • 1989 Canadian Championships 1st 
  • 1989 U.S. Open 1st 
  • 1988 Pan Am Championships 1st 
  • 1986 Pan Am Championships 1st

Canadian Records 

Juvenile Boys TRICKS 

  • 1979 Western Championship 3130 points 
  • 1980 Western Championship 4640 points 
  • 1981 Supreme Record Capability 5640 points 

Boys III  TRICKS 

  • 1982 Western Championship 6180 points 
  • 1983 Eastern Championship 6240 points 
  • 1984 Canadian Masters 7960 points 
  • 1984 Group I Championship 8250 points 
  • JUMP 
  • 1983 Western Super Stars 40.8 m (133’10”) 51 kph 
  • Men I 

SLALOM 

(58 kph boat speed) 

1988 Thrilla in Hydrilla 5 @ 11.25 m (53 buoys) 

TRICKS 

1986 Canadian Masters 8390 points 

1986 Group I Championship 8510 points 

1986 National Championship 8910 points 

1987 World Championship 8970 points 

1987 World Championship 9270 points 

1988 Alberta Championship 9720 points 

1989 World Championship 9820 points 

JUMP 

1988 Pan-Am Championship 55.7 m (183’) 

1989 Hall of Fame 58.7 m (192’5”) 

Men II 

TRICKS 

1995 National Championship 9190 points 

JUMP 

(57 kph) 

1995 World Championship 55.4 m (181’ 9”) 

Continue Reading No Comments

Joel McClintock

joel-mcclintock-768x960Joel McClintock has been successful in water skiing as a competitor, coach, author, television commentator and businessman.

In competition, McClintock was part of the world’s most successful family in the sport, which included his sister Judy, who’ll also be one of the first seven inductees into the Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada Hall of Fame. He learned to water ski at age three, competed for the first time at five and won his first national title at 11. The highlight of his senior level career was winning the overall title at the world championships in 1979. He competed at five worlds in total. He was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.

”Winning the world title was a huge deal for me because the sport was my whole life up to that point,” he said. ”That was my focus from the time I was 12-years-old. Nothing else mattered. Fortunately for me, many other wonderful things happened to me afterward including my involvement with the national team as a coach.”

As a coach, McClintock guided Canada to the world team title in 1991 and 1993 and was a three-time winner of the joel-mcclintockbook-768x659Coaching Association of Canada’s Excellence Award. In addition, he authored The Complete Instructional Book of Waterskiing, produced an instructional videotape on the sport, was host of Watersports World, a nationally syndicated TV program for three years and provided expert analysis on TV for major events such as the Masters.

He currently operates Palm Beach Water Sports, a water skiing school in Florida.

Career Highlights

  • Learned to ski at age 3
  • Learned to jump at age 4
  • First competition – 1965 (age 5) – jump only
  • First National Championships – 1970 (age 10)
  • First National Championship Title – 1971 (age 11)
  • 1972-76, Many National Records and Titles
  • First World Championships, 1977 – Finished 5th Overall
  • 1979 World Overall Champion
  • 1980-85: Represented Canada at three more World Championships
  • 1987-95: Coached Canadian team (1991 and 1993 Team Canada won World Title)
  • Canadian Men’s III slalom record- 1 @ 10.25m (41′ off 34 m.p.h.).
  • Canadian Amateur Athlete of the Year 1979
  • Inducted into Canadian Sports Hall of Fame
  • Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada Coach of the Year – 1991
  • Two-time recipient of Longines Wittnauer Coaching Excellence Award
  • 2002 Petro-Canada Coaching Excellence Award

He is author of

“The Complete Instructional Book of Waterskiing” and has produced an instructional video tape entitled “A Skiers Guide to Excellence”.

After skiing on the Canadian National Team from 1977 to 1985, McClintock retired from international competition and has since focused his time and energy on coaching waterskiing. From 1987 to 1996 he coached the Canadian National Waterski Team which won two World Championship team titles during that time period.mclintock-joel-jeff-judy-768x1106

McClintock was also the personal coach for his sister, Judy Messer-McClintock. Joel and Judy McClintock are the only siblings who have each won World Overall Titles.

McClintock was the host of the national television program “Watersports World” for three seasons and has done live commentary at the Masters and numerous other live and TV events.

National/International Results

  • Competition Year Event Placing/Record
  • World Championship 1977 Overall 5th
  • Pan American Championship 1978
  • Canadian Championships 1978 Open Tricks Gold
  • Canadian Championships 1978 Open Slalom Gold
  • Moomba Masters 1979 Overall Silver
  • U.S. Masters 1979 Jump Gold
  • U.S. Masters 1979 Overall Silver
  • California International Cup 1979 Overall Gold
  • World Championship 1979 Overall Gold
  • 9 year National Team member (1977 to 1985)

Canadian Records

Open Men 
SLALOM 
1978 Pan Am Championship 4 @ 12.0m (46 buoys) 
1979 National Championships 2 @ 11.25m (50 buoys) 
1981 Liz Allan SuperStars 3 @ 11.25m (51 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 4 @ 11.25m (52 buoys) 
1992 Trophy Lakes Autumn Record (Co-holder) 2.5 @ 10.75m (56.5 buoys)

TRICKS 
1977 Western Championship 5320 points 
1978 Eastern Championship 5470 points 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 6020 points 
1979 Lakeland Open 6350 points 
1980 California International Cup 7300 points

Juvenile Boys 
JUMP 
1973 Simplicity Open 33.0m (108′) 49 kph

Boys III 
SLALOM 
1978 Eastern Championship 2.5 @ 12.00 m 
1978 Pan Am Championship 4 @ 12.00 m

TRICKS 
1977 Western Championship 5320 points 
1978 Eastern Championship 5470 points 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 6020 points

Men I 
SLALOM 
1978 Pan Am Championship 4 @ 12.0 m (46 buoys) 
1979 National Championship 2 @ 11.25 m (50 buoys) 
1981 Liz Allan SuperStars 3 @ 11.25 m (51 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 4 @ 11.25 m (52 buoys)

TRICKS 
1977 Western Championship 5320 points 
1978 Eastern Championship 5470 points 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 6020 points 
1979 Lakeland Open 6350 points 
1980 California International Cup 7300 points

Men II 
SLALOM 
1992 Trophy Lakes Autumn Record 2.5 @ 10.75 m

Continue Reading No Comments

Judy McClintock-Messer’s

Judy McClintock-Messer’s numbers speak for themselves. She won world titles 10 years apart (1985 in tricks and 1995 in overall and tricks), broke Canadian records 48 times and still holds the tricks mark today, was on the national team for 19 years (1978-1996) and competed at every world championships during those years-.an international record. She also won 30 national crowns and claimed four Masters titles. Incredibly, when she retired in 1996 she was only 33-years-old.

‘’Water skiing was a big activity in our family spearheaded by my parents,’’ recalled McClintock-Messer, the youngest of five children and the only girl. Three of her brothers were on the national team as well. ‘’We were lucky enough to have competitive water skiers living close by, so we got involved in that. By the time I was nine I won my first national title. I was geared towards competition right from the start.’’

Of course with such a record, you would think McClintock-Messer ate, slept and drank water skiing. However she married Perry John Messer at age 22 in 1985 and they launched successful fitness business in Northampton, Massachusetts and started a family. That didn’t slow McClintock-Messer at all. She kept winning in water skiing, the business thrived and they had three children.

McClintock-Messer and her brother Joel McClintock were the first siblings to win world titles and they also helped end the American’s 40-year-reign in the team event at the 1991 worlds. Today McClintock-Messer is an avid runner who participates in many events such as the Boston Marathon.

Career Summary

  • Started waterskiing at age 3
  • Started competitive waterskiing at age 8
  • First National Championships age 10 – won gold medal Jr. Girls Tricks
  • First International competition – 1977 World Championships in Milan, Italy (Alternate)
  • First World Championships – Toronto, Canada 1979
  • 19-year member (1978 to 1996) of Canada’s National Team
  • Participated in every World Championship 1979-1995
  • Contributed to Team score in every Worlds she skied in
  • Won more than 30 National titles
  • Is a 48-time National record holder, still retaining the Canadian Open trick record to this day
  • 1980s won prestigious U.S. Masters Overall and three U.S. Masters Trick titles
  • 1985 – Married Perry John Messer, started business, Nautilus Fitness Centre
  • 1985 – Women’s World Trick Champion, Toulouse, France
  • 1987 – Inducted in to the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame
  • 1985-90 – Continued to compete and accumulate International honors
  • 1991-93 – Prominent player in history, helping Canada the first to defeat the U.S. for the World Team title after 40 years of competition. Defended World Title in 1993 for back to back wins.
  • September 17, 1995 – Crowned Women’s World Overall Champion. Also received bronze medal in tricks
  • 1996 – Retired from competitive waterskiing in 1996 at age 33

The Judy McClintock-Messer Story

Judy McClintock Messer’s athletic career as a waterskier is pure fairytale material. Born to Doctor J.P. McClintock (D.D.S.) and Joyce McClintock, Judy is the youngest of five children and the only girl.

Judy grew up in a very competitive environment with four brothers, three of whom are also avid waterskiers. With an early start to waterskiing at age 3 and a competitive career starting at age 8, Judy showed promise to being one of Canada’s elite athletes.

By age 10, Judy, known affectionately as Buff because of her resemblance to Buffy in t.v.’s Family Affair, was competing and winning at the national level. There was no turning back. Judy rapidly progressed through all levels of competition and consistently came out on top, even in fields of competitors much her senior in age and experience.

Judy was showing signs of her world champion potential. In 1979 McClintock represented Canada at the World Championships. She would continue this responsibility for the next 16 years, skiing in more World Championships than any other athlete in the sport. By the mid ’80s, Judy was strongly established as an International force, having won the prestigious U.S. Masters overall title and trick title in 1981 as well as many other Pan American and World medals.

In 1985, Judy proved herself the best in the world by winning the gold medal in women’s tricks at the World Championships in Toulouse, France. Having reached that pinnacle that few athletes ever achieved Judy could have easily rationalized retirement. By then she had married, supported her husband’s efforts to start their own fitness business in Northampton, Massachusetts and was looking forward to starting a family. She did all of the above except retire!

From 1985 onward, Judy had her hands full. She would now be a part time athlete while being a full time businesswoman and mother. And as would be expected Judy excelled at all three. With new priorities in life, Judy the mature athlete wisely focused on select goals.

There were only two things left for Judy McClintock Messer in the sport of waterskiing. The prestigious World Overall Title and the seemingly impossible World Team Title. To date the U.S. had dominated as a team, having never in 40 years of competition, been defeated in the World Championships. In 1991 history was made and Judy reduced her goals by one when Team Canada won the World Team Title in Austria.

Again, to the waterski world, Judy had done it all and this would be the opportune time for this busy and worldly women to bow out. But Judy Messer, like few other athletes, recognizes the inner need beyond the desire to win. Judy is and always has been a contributor. And now a critical part of the World Champion Team this was not the time for Judy to quit. Judy went on to be a prominent member of the 1993 Canadian Team which defended its world title. By 1995, at age 31, many thought Judy had accomplished everything and contributed generously and would surely change her priorities and not show up to perform at the 1995 World Championships.

What these people hadn’t considered was that Judy’s priorities had changed many years before and that in fact it was her peace of mind combined with unparallel discipline and focus that made it possible to continue to compete among the best in the world even as a part time athlete. 1995 was a year of unprecedented focus for Judy. From early in the season you could see in her eyes that deep inside she had the burning desire and more importantly truly believed that she had the ability to win the coveted world overall title that was the only fragment of prestige and honor that had eluded this champion.

Judy is the epitome of modesty. Never has she or would she talk about this being her year, but somehow, through an air of confidence that Judy exuded throughout the season we knew that she knew that it was her year. And so it was.

Judy pre-empted the World’s by using the Canadian Nationals as a stepping-stone at which she managed a clean sweep with gold medals in each of the three events to defend her national overall title. Judy flew to France with the Canadian Team for a week of training to acclimatize and fine tune for the big event. Training went flawlessly. Judy was on track. She went into competition with a level of confidence that even this seasoned athlete had never enjoyed.

From her first event on the water things went great and just kept getting better. Messer was the only female athlete to qualify for the finals in all three disciplines. On Sunday, September 17, 1995, Judy Messer reached yet another pinnacle in the sport of waterskiing as she was crowned World Overall Champion.

Having achieved this honor Judy also established some firsts. Judy is the first Canadian woman to win the World Overall Title. Judy and her brother / teammate / coach Joel McClintock are the first sister and brother to have both won World Titles. Judy Messer retired prior to the 1997 World Championships. She went out in fitting glory after an unprecedented waterskiing career.

National/International Results

Competition

Year

Event

Placing/Record

Canadian Championships

1980

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1980

Jump

Gold

The Masters Water Ski Tournament

1981

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1981

Jump

Bronze

Canadian Championships

1982

Slalom

Gold

The Masters Water Ski Tournament

1983

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1983

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1983

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1983

Overall

Gold

Canadian Championships

1985

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1985

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1985

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1985

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1985

Tricks

Gold

World Championships

1985

Overall

Silver

Canadian Championships

1986

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1986

Jump

Gold

The Masters Water Ski Tournament

1987

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1987

Tricks

Gold

World Championships

1987

Overall

bronze

Canadian Championships

1987

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1987

Overall

Gold

Canadian Championships

1988

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1988

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1988

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1988

Overall

Gold

Canadian Championships

1989

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1989

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1989

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1989

Overall

Gold

Canadian Championships

1990

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1991

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1991

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1991

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1991

Team

Gold

World Championships

1991

Overall

Bronze

Canadian Championships

1992

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1992

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1993

Team

Gold

World Championships

1993

Overall

Bronze

Canadian Championships

1995

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1995

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1995

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1995

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1995

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1995

Tricks

Bronze

Canadian Championships

1995

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1995

Overall

Gold

 

Records

Open Women SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1981 KP British Masters 1 1/2 @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 2 @ 12.0 m (44 buoys) 
1981 KP British Masters 1 1/2 @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 2 @ 12.0 m (44 buoys) 
1984 French Masters 5 @ 12.0 m (47 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1980 Eastern Championship 5300 points 
1981 Supreme Record Capability 6480 points 
1984 Lakeland 3 Round Trick 6760 points 
1984 Masters 6770 points 
1984 Group I Championship 6790 points 
1985 McCormick’s Spring Open 7170 points

JUMP

Date & Tournament Record 
1981 K.P. British Masters 38.5 m (126’4″) 
1982 Peter Stuyvesant Intl. 39.9 m (130’11”) 
1987 Tournament of Champions 40.9 m (134′) 
1988 Pan American Championship 43.1 m (141′)

Juvenile Girls

SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1975 National Championship 4 @ 18.25 m (34 buoys) 
1977 Eastern Championship 1 @ 14.25 m (43 buoys) 
1977 National Championship 2 1/2 @ 14.25 m (44.5 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1976 Eastern Championship 2840 points 
1977 Eastern Championship 3660 points

Girls III

SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1979 National Championship 3 @ 13.0 m (39 buoys)(Co-holder) 
1981 K.P. British Masters 1 1/2 @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 3830 points 
1978 National Championship 3880 points 
1979 Lakeland Open 4360 points 
1980 Eastern Championship 5300 points 
1981 Supreme Record Capability 6480 points

JUMP

Date & Tournament Record 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 30.5 m (100′) 
1978 Group I Championship 32.0 m (105′) 
1979 World Championship 32.7 m (107′) 
1981 K.P. British Masters 38.5 m (126’4″)

Women I

SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1981 KP British Masters 1 1/2 @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 2 @ 12.0 m (44 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1979 Lakeland Open 4360 points 
1980 Eastern Championship 5300 points 
1981 Supreme Record Capability 6480 points 
1984 Lakeland 3 Round Trick 6760 points 
1984 Masters 6770 points 
1984 Group I Championship 6790 points 
1985 McCormick’s Spring Open 7170 points

JUMP

Date & Tournament Record 
1981 K.P. British Masters 38.5 m (126’4″) 
1982 Peter Stuyvesant Intl. 39.9 m (130’11”) 
1987 Tournament of Champions 40.9 m (134′)

Women II

SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1989 National Championship 4 @ 12.0 m (46 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1989 National Championship 6920 points

JUMP

Date & Tournament Record 
1989 National Championship 35.2 m (106’6″) 
1993 Ontario Championship 41.0 m (134’5″)

Continue Reading No Comments

Pat Messner

Pat Messner has the distinction of being Canada’s only Olympic medallist in water skiing. That happened at the 1972 Games where water skiing was on the program as a demonstration sport. She won the bronze in women’s slalom, an achievement that launched a successful international career.

”Being at the Olympics was an amazing experience,” said Messner, who was coached by her father Joe Messner, a 15-time national champion. They currently run Mesle Canada Water Ski School in Ottawa. ”I wish it could have been granted official status but unfortunately it didn’t work out. Still, water skiing remains extremely popular at the participation and that in large parts explains Canada’s continued success.”

After the Olympics, Messner ran off a string of firsts for a Canadian woman. She won four world championship medals including the gold in women’s slalom in 1979. She was the first Canadian woman to win gold at the Masters Tournament finishing first in slalom in 1978. Messner collected 18 national titles- the first in 1964- and broke Canadian records 19 times. She was on the national team in 1972 and from 1975-80.

Career Highlights

  • The only Canadian water skier to have won an Olympic medal – she won bronze in the women’s s slalom event at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, when water skiing debuted as a demonstration sport.
  • Following the Olympic medal, she won 4 subsequent world championship medals, including the gold medal in women’s slalom in 1979.
  • Captured 18 Canadian champion titles from 1965 to 1979.
  • Held 19 different Canadian records in her career.

Awards and Achievements

  • 1967 – Centennial Sports Achievement Award (Ontario)
  • 1972 – Ontario Sports Achievement Award
  • 1979 – Athlete of the Year (Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada)
  • 1981 – Member of the Order of Canada
  • 1984 – Induction into the Greater Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame
  • 1987-91 — Served on the national coaching committee of Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada
  • Served on the Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada Adapted Towed Water Sports Committee

Olympic Results 
Olympic Games 1972 Women’s Slalom (Demonstration Sport) Bronze

National/International Results

    Competition Year Event Placing/Record
  • Canada Summer Games 1968 Slalom Bronze
  • Canadian Championships 1968 Slalom Gold
  • Pan American Championships 1972 Slalom Silver
  • Carl Fischer Cup (Austria) 1972 Slalom Gold
  • Carl Fischer Cup (Austria) 1972 Tricks Gold
  • Carl Fischer Cup (Austria) 1972 Overall Gold
  • World Championships 1975 Slalom Bronze
  • Pan American Championships 1976 Slalom Gold
  • World Championships 1977 Team Bronze
  • World Championships 1977 Slalom Silver
  • The Masters Water Ski Tournament 1978 Slalom Gold(first for a Canadian woman)
  • The Masters Water Ski Tournament 1978 Trick Silver
  • World Championships 1979 Slalom Gold(first for a Canadian woman)
  • World Championships 1979 Team Bronze
  • Aqaba Interntaional (Jordan) 1979 Slalom Gold
  • Aqaba Interntaional (Jordan) 1979 Tricks Gold
  • Aqaba Interntaional (Jordan) 1979 Overall Gold

Member of the National Water Ski Team in 1972 and from 1975 to 1980. 18-time Canadian national champion from 1964 to 1979

Canadian Records

Open Women 

SLALOM 
1972 National Championship 2 @ 13.0 m (38 buoys)* 
1974 National Championship 2 1/2 @ 13.0 m (38.5 buoys) 
1975 World Championship 3 1/2 @ 13.0 m (39.5 buoys) 
1976 Group I Championship 5 @ 13.0 m (41 buoys)

TRICKS 
1974 National Championship 3290 points 
1976 National Championship 3750 points 
1977 Eastern Championship Rd.1 4070 points 
1977 Eastern Championship Rd.2 4250 points

Juvenile Girls 

TRICKS 
1968 National Championship 1200 points

Girls III 

SLALOM 
1 @ 18.25 m (19 buoys)* 
1971 National Capital Open 5 @ 14.25 m (35 buoys)*

Women I 

SLALOM 
1972 National Championship 2 @ 13.0 m (38 buoys)* 
1974 National Championship 2 1/2 @ 13.0 m (38.5 buoys) 
1975 World Championship 3 1/2 @ 13.0 m (39.5 buoys) 
1976 Group I Championship 5 @ 13.0 m (41 buoys) 
TRICKS 
1974 National Championship 3290 points 
1976 National Championship 3750 points 
1977 Eastern Championship Rd.1 4070 points 
1977 Eastern Championship Rd.2 4250 points

Continue Reading No Comments