Q+A with Jaimee Bull

The 2021 season for Jaimee Bull was exceptional. With seven wins including the US Masters and Open Worlds, you could say that Jaimee dominated in 2021. 

We had the opportunity to interview Jaimee and we received great insight into her skiing career and her life outside of skiing. 

From starting to ski at the age of 3, to being named the Outstanding Graduate in Mechanical Engineering, to becoming WORLD CHAMPION – Jaimee Bull does it all.  

2021 Wins:

Masters Champion
Lake 38 Pro Am Champion
Ski Stillwaters Pro Team Challenge Champion
Hilltop Pro Am Champion
U21 World Champion
Open World Champion
NCWSA National Champion

The Interview:

Bull skiing at age 5 on Trout Lake, Ontario

Water Ski Canada (WSC): How did you start water skiing? 

Jaimee Bull (JB): I was introduced to water skiing by my family. I grew up on a public lake and my parents were always out skiing with their friends, so I was surrounded by skiing and naturally wanted to join the fun. At the age of two I was being towed on skis across the shallow water on the beach, and could ski behind the boat at 3 years old. 

WSC: Why did you choose water skiing? 

JB: I chose water skiing because it was a fun family-oriented sport. Being on the water is a very cool sensation and the competition side of skiing was a big draw for me.

WSC: What has been the most significant impact so far in your water ski career? 

JB: I think the fact that I have done so many other sports has allowed me to do well in skiing. Growing up in Canada I could only ski when there was no ice on the lake, so I had a lot of time in the off season to do other sports. This allowed me to gain great body awareness and learn how to maximize coaching and on water time. 

WSC: What have you learned from being an athlete? 

JB: Being an athlete has taught many valuable life lessons. It has also helped me develop many life skills such as how to manage my time as well as how to be committed, dedicated and hard working. The value of a quality support team and the importance of solid relationships has also been taught to me through being an athlete. 

WSC: Do you have a pre-competition routine? If so, what does it look like? 

JB: I usually just try to stay out of the sun and put myself in situations that keep me calm and focus prior to an event. 

WSC: Do different events and titles have different meanings? How does winning different events compare to each other? 

JB: Yes, absolutely! Masters was my first major win, and that win came with a lot of emotion and excitement surrounding it due to the history of the event. Winning Open Worlds meant a lot as it crowned me World Champion and it was at Jack Travers Sunset Lakes which is where I train when in Florida, making it even more special. I knew I had the ability to win both Worlds and Masters but I went into Worlds with a plan which I was able to execute, making me feel very confident and strong throughout the event. Each of the wins throughout the season had a different meaning, for example, Lake 38 was the first time I was top seed with a big score to beat since I was a junior so that also felt like a big win, but this time in terms of experience. 

WSC: How do you manage the pressure within sport? 

JB: I try to appreciate the pressure because it means that I care about the outcome of my skiing. I try to ensure that most of the pressure I feel is self inflicted due to the expectations I set for myself.

Bull at the 2021 Masters

WSC: Has there been a particular person who has made an impact on your life/skiing career? 

JB: I have been incredibly fortunate to have a ton of support to allow me to pursue skiing, from hometown to corporate sponsors, to mentors and teammates. Despite all the support I have received, my family has had the most significant impact on my skiing as they introduced me to the sport and allowed me to pursue skiing. They also taught me a love for being on the water while my older brother fostered my competitive attitude. 

WSC: What kind of sacrifices have you had to make for sport? 

JB: I try not to view things as sacrifice, as anything I chose to do was my decision and because I wanted to pursue skiing. I had to sacrifice some of my social life in high school to make sure I was able to wake up and ski in the morning before school. I also missed a fair amount of high school because I would leave in the spring and fall for tournaments and some training camps. My summer was jammed packed so looked a lot different from that of my friends. While my daily life was much different than those of my friends, everything that I ‘missed’ out on was filled with super amazing and valuable experiences that I gained from skiing. Not many highschoolers have been to as many places around the world as I had or have friends from all around the world. 

WSC: What is your favourite thing about water skiing? 

JB: My favourite thing about water skiing is the feeling of gliding on the water and experiences I have gained through the sport. 

WSC: What is your favourite memory in water skiing? 

JB: I have so many amazing memories from skiing that are special for different reasons, but I think my favourite memories have to be skiing with my whole family on the public lake we live on in Canada. 

WSC: What would be your advice to the next generation of water skiers? 

JB: Take in all the knowledge that surrounds you. You learn so much from watching others. Some of the greatest skills I have learned have been from observing skiers like Jon Travers and Will Asher train. 

WSC: Is there someone who inspired you as a young athlete? Who and why? 

JB: Will Asher, Job Travers, Karina Nowlan – all because they were not only hard-working, successful athletes, but they are also great people. My older brother also inspired me, if it weren’t for Jaret, I would likely not be where I am today. 

WSC: What does your daily routine look like? 

JB: My daily routine fluctuates significantly throughout the year depending on the season and if I am in school. An average day in the spring consists of skiing, going to class, hitting the gym and doing homework. 

WSC: What can we find you doing off the water? 

JB: I love doing anything outside but try to spend as much time as possible alpine skiing in the winter. 

WSC: What books/movies/tv shows have you been enjoying recently? 

JB: Research articles on hip implants and hand fractures. My last year of engineering has been quite busy with projects. One focuses on hip implants while the other focuses on hand fractures so unfortunately I’m actually not joking when I say that’s what I’ve been reading lately. 

Bull at the 2021 Open World Championships

WSC: What do you enjoy doing to relax? 

JB: I enjoy spending time outside in nature and doing other sports. 

WSC: Do you have any secret talents? 

JB: Hmm, this one is tough, probably my ability to do a pistol squat on nearly anything. 

WSC: What’s one thing that no one knows about you? 

JB: I don’t have Netflix and don’t often watch TV, movies, or YouTube. 

WSC: Where do you go to school? What are you studying and when do you graduate?  

JB: The University of Louisiana at Lafayette. I am majoring in Mechanical Engineering and minoring in Biomedical Engineering. I graduate very soon! I will graduate from my undergrad in May 2022. 

WSC: What are your academic achievements? 

JB: I am the 2022 Mechanical Engineering outstanding graduate. I have been on the presidents List for the duration of my degree. 

WSC: How have you balanced your studies and skiing/training? 

JB: Finding a balance is often challenging but I think being willing to shift my priorities daily has helped me maximize both. Some days more emphasis goes to school and skiing has to be on the back burner and other days it’s vice versa. 

WSC: Did you prepare differently going into 2021 than any other year? 

JB: 2021 had a different start to the season for me for sure. Due to COVID, my school was online, so I was in Canada until the end of February when I had to return to Lafayette to complete a few things for labs. I then flew to Florida for a couple weeks to ski at Jack Travers Ski School. I had to go back to school once again but then drove to Florida at the end of April where I finished my semester. In the pas, I have only been able to go to Florida to train with my coaches after the semester has finished (around the first week of May) so the extra training time this year definitely proved to be incredibly helpful. 

WSC: What was your highlight of 2021? 

JB: Winning the Open World Championships and setting a World Championship Record. 

WSC: In one word, describe the 2021 season for yourself. 

JB: Over-exceeding. 

WSC: What’s next for you? 

JB: I’m not too sure so we’ll see! 

WSC: To finish, we would like to give you the opportunity to shout-out or thank anyone you would like to. 

JB: There are many people that have been incredibly influential in my career and I will not be able to name all of them here, but I would like to say a huge thank you to my family, coaches, and sponsors for their ongoing support.

Bull at the 2021 World Championships

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WATER SKI CANADA’S 2022 JUNIOR NATIONAL AND DEVELOPMENT TEAMS ANNOUNCED

Water Ski Canada is pleased to announce the athletes who have been selected to represent Canada as part of the National Development and Junior Teams. 

These athletes have competed and achieved impressive results at regional, national, and international competitions, including medals at the Can Am Championships, Pan Am Championships, World Championships, and victories at prestigious competitions. In the 2021 season, Canada had athletes podium at all international events where Canada was represented. 

“Canada had one of the best seasons yet in 2021, thanks to our committed athletes. The 2022 National Junior and Development Teams are well deserving athletes who have achieved remarkable results this past season,” said Steve Bush, National Water Ski Coach. 

The teams are represented by athletes from across Canada. The selected athletes are a mix of returning team members and up and coming athletes in Canada who have come through the provincial and regional programs. 

There are five families who have two or more siblings on the Teams. This showcases how water skiing is a family sport and allows siblings to train, compete, and support each other. 

The National Development and Junior Team athletes will be outstanding representatives of Canada and the sport of water skiing. 

 

National Development Team

Ethan Barkwell – ON, Nikola Barkwell – ON, Taylor Barkwell – ON, Zachery Barkwell – ON, Ty Bigourdan – ON, Leo Bigourdan – ON, Carly Bonham – AB, Jacob Chambers – BC, Louis Cuillert – QC, Jaret Goulah – BC, Linden Pinette – BC, Lucas Pinette – BC and Kate Pinsonneault – BC

 

Jr. National Team

Nellie Allard – QC, Olivia Chute – NS, Micky Geller – ON, Christopher Horwood – BC, Jonathon Horwood – BC, Evan Kraus – AB, Sean Kraus – AB, Carter Lucas – SK, Shae O’brien – AB, Megan Pelkey – AB, Charlie Ross – ON and Hannah Stopnicki – QC 






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UPDATED SANCTION POLICY

CLICK HERE to view Water Ski Canada’s updated sanction policy.

Purpose: The purpose of this policy is to outline the conditions under which a Water Ski sanction will be issued under the sanction program of WSWC.

Scope and Authority: This policy shall apply to all competitive water ski events in Canada conducted by a member PSO, Club, School or by WSWC

Topics discussed in policy:

-Sanction Fees

-Sanction Requirements

-Sanction Applications

-Naming Rights Policy

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact info@wswc.ca

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